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 Understanding Mechanical Transfer

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PostSubject: Understanding Mechanical Transfer   Sat Oct 10, 2009 5:32 pm

Mechanical Transfer: energy passing from one mechanical conduit to another

The transferring of energy from one part to another is what gives any system it's fundamental sonic set of values. When there is a fair exchange of signal from the beginning to end of the audio chain your audio system will then be able to reproduce a realistic sound stage.

Sound staging is much more than size of an image, it is tonal balance as well. Tonal balance and sound staging must work hand and hand to achieve real sound. The more we tune the more we realize that our system is one big component. Marketing has divided the audio chain into sell-able packages but when seeking the absolute sound we find ourselves reversing the process of chassis and boxes. Housing components can build in sonic characters (in the music reproduction) that are hard to get out of the way of the audio signal itself. When we tune we remove the parts of a system that block the sound from developing a proper audio signal. Once we do remove these music dampening obstructions we are able to establish an energy moving conduit system that allows the recorded music to be reproduced in it's original state or desired altered state.

Tuning of conduits can be done at a micro level by the use of my tooling tools. From the individual part to the room you can make your system variable. Below is a basic chart to show you some of the key places of tuning before you break every thing down to a part by part tuning assembly.



Looking at the chart you can start to see why the transfer of the mechanical energy is so important to the sound. This is why I make strong warnings against over dampening. Dampening destroys the hierarchy of the natural transfer progression which ultimately determines how real our sound becomes. Signal preservation and restoration is our goal.

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PostSubject: Re: Understanding Mechanical Transfer   Wed Nov 11, 2009 11:54 pm

Hi Techno-zone,

Each point of transfer has a value (vibration efficiency). This is a value that when reaching the optimum will cause a "full range transfer". A full range transfer is the goal of any point of transfer.

Why is this important?

If a value of transfer is not full range we are force to compromise quality for quantity by having to boost a part of the signal path to make up for another part. It is better to make all parts as equal as possible.

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PostSubject: Re: Understanding Mechanical Transfer   Thu Jan 28, 2010 5:06 pm

Hi Techno-zone

As we learn about tuning we start to realize how much music is in a recording that the average audiophile will never hear from their system. Mechanical transfer plays a huge part in retrieving this music. Many of you have already come to the place where you understanding "how much is really there". When a piece of music goes from conceptual space to being in the room with you it can be shocking cause you have moved from the thought that music has boundaries to an infinite range of detail and space.

We should always pay close attention to a point of transfer as being a combination of weight, size, saturation, response, and speed.

Weight is the amount of pressure that moves toward a gravity source. Different materials have molecular patterns that vary with density to make up a measurement of pull to that source.

Size works hand and hand with weight through girth, mass, and saturation. The rate of transfer changes dramatically with different sizes of materials based on how much energy travels through and is saturated by any given material.

Saturation is the amount of energy that is retained by a piece of material before and after energy passes through it.

Response is the factor of range within a transfer point. If the weight, size, saturation, and the conditions that go with these 3 are in balance than the response will be a full range transfer.

Speed is the rate of transfer that has to do with how long it takes for a fair exchange of information to take place from one point to the next point.

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PostSubject: Re: Understanding Mechanical Transfer   Thu Sep 08, 2011 8:39 pm



If you think your system sounds lifeless, lacking warmth and emotion, than you need to read these product pages very carefully and think about where you might want to get started. Going where? On a journey that you never thought your music reproduction system would ever take you.

If your system is not playing instruments that are real size (which is the biggest problem in audio) than you know your system has been taken over by distortion or is not able to be played in-tune. Your soundstage should be much bigger than the room you are playing it in and should go far beyond the sides of the speakers. Your system should also be able to play all around you from a stereo setup. You should be able to get out of what some call "the sweet spot" and be able to see an image without the music running into the speakers. If you do not have this than you are out of tune.

How do you get in-tune? By learning how your system needs to vibrate and be tuned to harmonize the parts.



Tweaking an audio system has become as big as the components and speakers themselves. The audio industry quickly jumps on fads when someone hears a difference. Different is not always a good thing but what it has done is shown us that systems are highly effected by the energy that is around and touching them. MGA has gone farther in this area than anyone, building entire systems out of tunable parts. The more we tune the more music we hear and the closer we get to real performances as opposed to the sterile sound that so many have excepted. Just how good can a system become? Good enough to keep you in your listening chair and in the listening room for a long time.



Your system is not only interconnected by wire and solder joints, it is also interconnected by energy that is carrying and supporting the audio signal. This energy wants to makes it's way to ground and it will do so in harmony or distorting. Either way it will make this trip and you will hear your system in tune or out of tune. MGA tools are here to keep your music in-tune every inch of the audio chain.



Without taking the step of mechanically grounding your components you are loosing at least 30% of the music content the system is trying to pass. It would be very rare to go from the component rack or speaker to the floor or ground without distortion because of the missing dissipating step that a platform provides.



Any way you look at it a chassis is a shipping box housing the parts and pieces making the sound. They are also huge limiting factors in the way the parts need to resonate energy as well as pass it. Many who have already shifted from big boxes to plate type open designs will tell you how much more open their sound is once the chassis is taken out of the equation. Removing the box is a tremendously big step forward in the tuning revolution and for high end.




Regardless of how you tweak or how much you tweak the Platform is the biggest missing link in High End Audio's chain. Systems are not able to open up fully without the platform under both the speakers and the components.



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PostSubject: Re: Understanding Mechanical Transfer   Thu Sep 08, 2011 8:41 pm





AAB1X1

This is the geometry of the future. I've cleaned up the transfer by at least 50% I would say over the audiopoint and 33% over the MTD. What this means musically is an explosion of dynamic resolution.



The gathering of the energy "flange" is more full therefore there is more to work with. High frequencies are more balanced and open (much closer to the sound of Harmonic Springs). The range top to bottom is more rich (tube sounding) without the roll off on either end.

The middle "bell" is extremely dynamic giving tons of impact without frequency clotting or odd harmonic ringing. There's an increase in harmonic openness without fatiguing imbalance or stage shifting. The fundamentals are in line with their respective harmonics producing a very life like real sound to the hallos around the instruments. The image size is greatly improved making it easier to tweak in the sound of the system.

The "stable point" is much improved giving an absolute resolve to the form and function of the cone. You can hear all the sound of the component above or below the cone defining the mechanical characteristic of the unit.


here's how they work

All energy is vibration. As your components make music they are producing vibrations that need to exchange with the environment's natural energies and waves in the air and solid materials. MGA cones make this exchange of energy "in tune" allowing the component to give it's maximum performance without distortion.











A recent interview:

"MGA makes 3 cones with points. the AAB1X1 is a solid Audio Alloy unit. The AAB1X1SB is a sonic bell design giving more open dynamics. Those wishing to make their solid state and digital gear sound more tubie the SB is the way to go. For Speakers the AAB1X1SBS will take the focus of a speaker and bring it to life. SBS is the most open setting of the line and can be used on electronics as well as speakers but the main design is to make the boxie sound of any component or speaker go away. On components if you don't want a big sound stage don't buy the SBS cause this cone gives you the real size of an instrument in playback mode.

The 3 cones can be mixed and matched and we highly recommend taking advantage of this. Here's why. Different parts of your components chassis deal with the passing of energy differently. If you have an area that is hosting the transformer it reacts completely different from the part of the chassis that is hosting light weight and less EMI radiation. Very light weight components under 2lbs work well with the same cones usually, but once above this weight there are magnetic and mass problems that easily arise and if using the same of any cone placed under a component you risk mechanical build up and spiking. It works like this. Take a pan of water and put it on a surface evenly and everything is stable. Now tilt the pan up on one end and watch the mass run toward the deep or heavy end. Add vibration to this and you have a real mess. We have found that with heavier components especially you are losing tons of the music by not aligning the vibratory characters inside and outside the chassis. Dampening causes distortion and likewise so does an uneven distribution. We have not as of yet found a component that can not be tuned to it's potential using these models of MGA cones. if you wish to use them as a one size fits all be prepared to have a fair favorable response and better response than any other transfer product. Use them together as tuning devices and be prepared for a whole new level of tweaking power and sound reproduction.

AAB1X1 great even transfer
AAB1X1SB more open
AAB1X1SBS maximum open

Support discs do not work. Never have never will. People buying discs to protect their surfaces are completely defeating the purpose of the point or cone. For this reason we have designed the round point cone in both the solid and bell designs. Oddly enough while designing this cone we found an amazing discovery. Many tube components like a round cone as compared to a pointed cone. Tubes that seem to sound slightly weak and distorted clean up and lower wattage amps seem to increase in perceived power output. MGA Cones R (round) are made the same height as the points so they may be part of the interchangeable tweaking.

The transfer game up till now has been incomplete. Listeners have been trading and testing tubes in combos for as long as audio has been around. Now the transfer of energy can be just as fine tuned. No more almost having the components and speakers performing at it's best. Michael after years of listening is bringing you the absolute sound through transfer."










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PostSubject: Re: Understanding Mechanical Transfer   Thu Jul 17, 2014 3:23 am

Mechanical transfer has always been a part of the music industry.



Yet the audiophile brain has a hard time, sometimes, dealing with this.

An audio component vibrates just like an instrument, but if someone is getting the simple explanation of amplification this what they hear.
______________________________________

The purpose of an amplifier is to receive a small electrical signal and enlarge or amplify it. In the case of a pre-amplifier the signal must be amplified enough to be accepted by a power amplifier. In the case of a power amplifier, the signal must be enlarged much more, enough to power a loudspeaker. Although amplifiers appear to be a mysterious ‘black box’, the basic operating principles are relatively simple. Simply stated, an amplifier receives an input signal from a source (CD player or other source) and creates an enlarged replica of the original smaller signal. The power required to do this comes from the 110-volt wall receptacle. So, an amplifier has three basic connections: an input from the source, an output to the speakers and a source of power from the 110-volt wall receptacle.

The power from the 110-volts is sent to the section of the amplifier known as the power supply where it is converted from alternating current to direct current. Direct current is like the power found in a battery - electrons, or electricity flows in one direction only (alternating current flows in both directions). From the ‘battery’ or power supply the electrical current is sent to a variable resistor, also known as a transistor. The transistor is essentially a valve, like a water valve, that varies the amount of current flowing through the circuit based on the input signal from the source. A signal from the input source causes the transistor to reduce or lower its resistance and allowing current to flow. The amount of current allowed to flow is based on the size of the signal from the input source. A large signal causes more current to flow and results in more amplification than the smaller signal. The frequency of the input signal also determines how quickly the transistor operates. For example, a 100Hz tone from the input source causes the transistor to open and close 100 times per second and a 1,000Hz tone from the input source causes the transistor to open and close 1,000 times per second. So, the transistor controls level (or amplitude) and frequency of the electrical current sent to the speaker, like a valve, and this is how it achieves its amplifying action.

Add a potentiometer, also known as a volume control to the system and you have an amplifier. The volume control allows the user to control the amount of current that goes to the speakers and thus the volume level. There are different types and designs of amplifiers, but essentially they all operate in this manner.

_________________________________________________

The audio signal has been reduced in importance and talked about on a tech level that leaves out the most important part the actual vibrating signal that travels along every part of the audio chain. Yes, this is an actual movement of the vibrations that have been picked up from the microphones and travel as continous flowing signal. If you as a listener can not get your mind around this the signal will never truly make sense to you.

Each part in the audio chain is actually "playing the music", that's how amazing this audio signal is. If you try to break this down to stop and start of each frequency your going to give yourself a headache because this pressure driven flow isn't something sitting still.

let me explain it this way

You walk by an electronic apliance in your house when it is running. You hear 60 cycles. That's because the power going to it is playing 60 cycles. Your audio signal is doing the same thing only it is a continous 20-20,000 plus cycles. Ever walk outside and hear your electric wires running to your house buzzing? Now picture that charge being fed thousands of cycles all varying quantities. Your audio signal is a flow of quantities that are vibrating the mechanical host that carrying them. What the microphone did to the electronic flow, your source is doing to your audio parts and pieces.

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PostSubject: Re: Understanding Mechanical Transfer   Fri Aug 22, 2014 9:31 pm

Lets be clear about this

read wiki http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vibration_isolation

Reading this you would think that the audio products that claim to isolate would be doing so, but there is a problem with this concerning sound and the vibrations found in the audio signal.

The audio signal consist of a wide range of frequencies in motion. In order for an isolation device to keep the audio signal from sliping into plus or minus signal distortion it would require an equalized variation that matched the signals structure and pattern. Meaning it would need to be able to float with the signal much like a drift board floating on top of the ocean.

With motion control that is able to work within a certain range it is one thing, but with something as delicate as the audio signal which is made of fundamentals and harmonic structures the common audiophile isolation products are not isolators at all but dampeners that prematurely dissipate the signal causing a distorted signal.

Would it be possible to make a true audio isolator? Sure, but it would require a sophistication beyond rubber mounts. The products that are out there now are not really isolators but couplers.

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