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 RoomTune Acoustical Treatment

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Michael Green
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Location: Vegas/Ohio/The Beach

PostSubject: RoomTune Acoustical Treatment   Sun Sep 26, 2010 10:19 am

"One of the very first tweaks audiophiles do after getting their stereo system is make the acoustics in the room sound good enough to allow the music on the recordings to come through as real (life like) as possible. The room is the biggest audio component and dictates the overall sound of the system.

This is no different from what I do on the recording end of the audio chain. Playback is about restoring what was done not adding to or taking away from the original."

This RoomTune product thread shares not only what the RT Pillow Treatment is, but why it is.



RoomTune is chosen for many of the worlds reference rooms as their acoustical design and treatment, such as the rehearsal and recital rooms at the Eastman School of Music (seen above). It is important to us when designing any audio product that it is created for it's ability to restore sound. You can also see the three main treatments that make up the TunePak (a ten piece set of treatments). This is the starting point of converting any room into a concert hall.

Below the TunePak. The TunePak is made up of 3 fitted acoustical treatments that allow you to make tuning your room a simple process.



How room acoustics work.

When we listen to sound in our rooms we are listening to air pressure. Sound waves do not traveling in a straight line to our ears, but instead spherical patterns called sound pressure.



taking a look at how loading developes in a your room

There are 2 main parts to what the sound pressure (build up) is doing. One, pressure zones, the other, laminar flow.

Laminar flow (laminar effect) happens along every surface in the room. As sources like a speaker or instrument for example creates a sound the waves move out from that point in a spherical pattern till they hit a surface.



All surfaces do some diffusion and some absorption, as well as vibrate becoming a source themselves. The walls, floor and ceiling are the biggest sources and as the oncoming waves hit them, the wall will feed back into the room it's own set of waves that push against the oncoming. This activity creates a flow of sound that travels along the wall, floor and ceiling which intersect in the corners forming corner loads.



This constant build up of energy is in every room and is what you hear. As the pressure forms it makes pressure zones that you can easily listen to as you walk around the room talking or making sound. Some areas are at a plus signal and some at a minus.

Sound in your room looks like this.



Pressure Zone Controlling and RoomTuning is what we have named taking control of the zones and other effects in the room, helping it to perform naturally and in harmony with the music content.  

Another look at the room loading so you can see how and why we treat in the areas we do.



Here is the RT Pillow product line and placement guide.

Starting with the CornerTune.


15"x15"x15"

When tuning a room it's best to get to the acoustical origins of the room first. Typically this build up happens in rooms upper corners. The lower corners are somewhat broken up by the furniture in the room, so the upper areas are the major points of loading. Walk to any of your corners look up and talk and you will hear what I mean.

With intent to restore the music, you don't want to kill the sound by having the burn side facing you. Let the energy get behind the RoomTune and burn while the live side of the pillow keeps the music linear.



As you treat your room your going to find the live side facing the listening position is almost always the best sounding. You can tell the burn side from the live by touch. The burn side feels soft while the live side you can feel the acoustical membrane.

Got the upper corners done, surprising isn't it?



Your on your way to being master of your listening room. The RT pillow products will do more for your sound than almost any tweak you can possibly do for your music. Instead of your speakers fighting the room they are starting to work with it.

Let's add the Echotune.


10"x16"

As you start tuning your upper mid-seams with the EchoTune some huge changes in the music begin to take place. The dynamics increase as well as the focus.



We put two EchoTunes in your TunePak, but you might want to treat all your upper mid-seams. Using one on the front wall and one on one of the side walls is great but many listeners choose to tune all their upper areas of build up. My recommendation is follow through with the rest of the TunePak placement instructions then begin to play around with some acoustical tricks which I'll show later.

The RTXLT


12"x24"

Things are getting serious now and your room has become a completely different listening environment from where we started.



The RoomTune pillow treatment has a response of 16hz-22khz covering the entire music spectrum. We do make a 12" x 48" XXLT version for bigger rooms.

RoomTune standard colors







Last edited by Michael Green on Sun Nov 02, 2014 11:42 pm; edited 31 times in total
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PostSubject: Re: RoomTune Acoustical Treatment   Sat Nov 01, 2014 11:46 pm

A little more on the topic of tuning, sound and recording

You may not know this but everything that is in the live room making sound you should be able to hear if within the microphone pattern and range, including the size of the room. The job of the speakers and the room is to recreate a 3 dimensional landscape of what was put in the recording.





So how big is a soundstage?

A lot of times when you are listening you see a soundstage picture in front of you that seems a certain size, but when you think about a recording itself isn't it much bigger than what I am hearing between my speakers? And shouldn't the sound be all around me instead of just in front? The answer is yes on both counts. If you put on a set of headphones you would hear music all around you and of course the sound goes far beyond the speakers placement. The same thing is true with your room. If your limited to sound only as wide as the speakers and a little space behind the speakers you are shutting down the speaker to room interface, and stopping the room from playing it's role as the natural space amplifier that it is.

Your amplifier is the first of three amplifiers in the chain. Amp, speakers and room.





It's a big mistake not to think of your room as an amplifier. The sound pressure in the room is what you hear. And if you look at the pattern of sound you can cleary see that it's natural for the sound waves to amplify.





Sometimes when talking and showing pictures about sound people stop a little short in showing the movement, size and shape of sound. You see it's very important when tuning in the sound of your room that you are picturing the soundwaves like above and not below.



Sound is round and when bent out of shape is looking to get round (spherical) again. Spherical is the natural shape of energy. It's a huge problem if you try to treat your room as if sound waves are straight lines and you are treating reflections.  Here's something that might help.

below are the pickup patterns of microphones



As you can see there is nothing straight line about the acoustical energy being gathered by the microphones.

now here's the output of a driver



Again there is nothing straight line about the actual signal being played and then being re-played. The microphone and speaker have the same relationships with their rooms. On the beginning end the signal is round and on the delivery, round as well.

Almost seems shocking doesn't it, hearing someone in audio say your hearing straight line reflections? Sound is anything but straight lines.

Let me do a little myth breaking in a couple more areas. It's extremely important in this industry that we spend our time on the oraganizing of energy and not the distorting of it.

In this particular case I think it's a good idea to look at what diffusion is according to Wikipedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diffusion

"In the audiophile world many myths have been created, the good of acoustical difussion is one of them. First off they could have used a better word cause diffusion refers more of spreading out, and the way some acoustical companies are doing "their" form of diffusion is to make waves disembodied. The audiophile world talks about killing waves or causing them to break up. Where does this help the sound? The idea of an acoustical space is to support the sound pressure not distroy it." mg VH1 interview 2004

take a look



Above you see audiophile diffusion in action. How are the waves shaped coming out of the speakers? Spherical. What happens to the waves when they hit a diffuse wall?

this times a couple hundred


the uniformity is lost

Above you can see the fight going on between the space and the speakers. This is acoustical distortion. What should be happening is the room helping the music to project by developing an organized support system that the listener can control the dimentions of. Below is the begining of acoustical organizing.



Dampening the room can be just as bad.

As bad as diffusion is, the oposite end of acoustics "dampening" can cause just as much distortion. The idea of the room as amplifier falls apart the more direct dampening you have in the room. The way to control a room without losing acoustical signal is to implement an acoustical baricade system. Simply put, don't have the speaker created soundwaves absorbed without an acoustical membrane between the dampening and the listener.

below, you can see the soundwaves not making it to the listener before being distorted



above, the waves make it to the listener in balance and with the correct amount of gain...RoomTuning instead of room killing

A baricade treatment will burn more energy and leave the listening area sounding like the material of the membrane that is being used to keep the burn away from the listener. Control without loosing content.

a common mistake

You don't want to kill the sound of the room with heavy drapes or dampened acoustical deadeners as this will leave the music lifeless and dull, missing vital parts of the recording. You also don't want to trap the sound leaving acoustical holes in the soundstage and dead spots. The best way to treat the room is to use a balanced approach with baricade treatments that act like stop signs for the extra waves, without creating other acoustical problems.

the goal

Our rooms are to play the role of the studio or hall, playing back what was originally recorded. In order to do this we want to make our space into our own personal mini concert hall. This is done best by using technologies that preserve an restore the sound.

RoomTune has been with you every step of the way. From the most advanced sounding room.


Big and small







To your private listening room


come look at more of our setups
http://tuneland.techno-zone.net/t249-a-look-at-tunable-systems

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PH 702 762 3245
Email mgtune@yahoo.com
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